Q. What is Four Weeks?

Q. How do I know which mini-magazine to read each week?

Q. What if I don't have a 28-day cycle?

Q. How do I sign up for the weekly newsletter?

Q. Isn't having a magazine that caters to a woman's hormone cycle reinforcing the anti-feminist idea that women are slaves to their hormones?

Q. What's up with the logo?

Q. What's your privacy policy?

Q. How do you choose what to feature in Four Weeks?

Q. Can I recommend something for Four Weeks to feature?

Q. Can I write for Four Weeks?

Q. How do I unsubscribe or change my email address?

Q. How do I advertise on Four Weeks?

Q. How do I contact Four Weeks if I have another question?

Q. What is Four Weeks?
A. Four Weeks is a free, monthly online women's magazine. We feature the best undiscovered and quintessential experiences in shopping, food, travel and DIY that every savvy woman should know about. But we also go one step further. We recommend only those products and places that a woman will enjoy most during each week of her monthly hormone cycle.

Q. How do I know which mini-magazine to read each week?
A. Four Weeks is made up four mini-magazines that represent each week of a woman's monthly hormone cycle. Your hormone cycle starts on the first day of your period, so that would start your Week 1. That's when you'd read the Week 1 mini-magazine. During the second week of your cycle, you'd read Week 2. During the third week of your cycle, you'd read Week 3. And during the fourth week of your cycle, you'd read Week 4.  Or, you can read them all at once to be prepared for the weeks to come.

Q. What if I don't have a 28-day cycle?
A. No problem. As long as you have a natural monthly menstrual cycle, you can adapt Four Weeks to any length cycle. Here's how:

Week 1: Lasts from the first day of your period to Day 7.

Week 2: Lasts from Day 8 to Day 13 or the day before ovulation. To determine when you ovulate is easy. Here's how.

Week 3: Lasts from Day 14 (in a typical 28-day cycle) or ovulation to Day 22.

Week 4: Lasts from Day 23 to the end of your cycle.

Q. How do I sign up for the weekly newsletter?
A. Head to the sign up page or fill out the form on the right.

Q. Isn't having a magazine that caters to a woman's hormone cycle reinforcing the anti-feminist idea that women are slaves to their hormones?
A. No. In fact, the more you know about how your hormones influence you, the more control you have over whether to go with your hormones' influences or not. For instance, you may feel less talkative on Week 3 due to sedating progesterone. But you may choose to override that quiet feeling in order to network at a business function. 

What's more, if you're going to make the argument that talking about female hormones perpetuates the stereotype of the hormonally-charged woman, you'd have to say the same exact thing about men. That's because men also have a hormone cycle and are just as influenced by it as women. (In fact, men have a 24-hour hormone cycle compared to our month-long cycle. So if you want to talk about moody!). To learn more about a man's 24-hour hormone cycle, visit the Men's Room at Hormonology.info.

The only anti-feminist part about a woman's hormone cycle is purposely ignoring scientific research that shows how it affects you simply because you're afraid that learning more about hormones might be anti-feminist. Knowing how your hormones affect your body and mind is simply practical. More importantly, it can be a baseline for your health. For instance, if you know you're supposed to be energetic during Week 2, but you feel sluggish, you may have an iron deficiency or other health issue.

The founder and editor of this magazine, Gabrielle Lichterman, is a nationally-known women's health journalist and has taken great pains and spent years studying scientific research to ensure that information contained in her book, 28 Days, and Four Weeks is based on fact. Her goal is to educate women and men about their hormone cycles as well as show them how to apply this information to their daily life to make every day better.

Q. What's up with the logo?
A. Contrary to rumors, the swoosh in the circle is not a modern art version of any part of the female anatomy. The swoosh represents the up-and-down pattern of a woman's monthly estrogen.

Q. What's your privacy policy?
A. We never share or sell any information we collect from you. Period.

Q. How do you choose what to feature in Four Weeks?
A. Everything you see featured in Four Weeks is based solely on decisions made by the editors. There is no pay for play. There may be advertisers whose products are also featured in Four Weeks and companies may donate products for readers. However, advertisers and donors are not given preferential treatment. Our features are chosen strictly based on merit. It's the only way we can guarantee that we're recommending the very best for you.

Q. Can I recommend something for Four Weeks to feature?
A. Absolutely. Submit your suggestion by visiting our submissions page.

Q. Can I write for Four Weeks?
A. We welcome queries from writers. Check out our writers guidelines first to get a feel for what we're looking for.

Q. How do I unsubscribe or change my email address?
A. You can subscribe, unsubscribe and change your email address on our subscriptions page.

Q. How do I advertise on Four Weeks?
A. Send an email to advertising[at]fourweeksmag.com or call us at (212) 987-4460.

Q. How do I contact Four Weeks if I have another question?
A. Head to our contact page. We'd be happy to hear from you.

  

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